Dr. Ulf Klostermann und
Dr. Lutz Frank vor dem wissenschaftliches Poster zur Rückenmarksstimulation

 

4th World Congress
World Institute of Pain – WIP

Budapest, Hungary, September 25-28, 2007

Auch auf dem 4. Weltkongress des World Institute of Pain in Budapest konnte unser Team ein wis-senschaftliches Poster zur Rückenmarksstimulation vorstellen.

Um eine optimale Therapie unseren Patienten anbieten zu können, muss sich auch unser Team ständig fortbilden. Auf internationalen Kongressen und Meetings werden die neuesten Forschungsergebnisse aus aller Welt vorgestellt.

Link zum Kongress:

www.kenes.com/wip2007 wissenschaftliches Poster (PDF)

Aus unserem Poster:

SCS IN FBSS: RECHARGEABLE SCS SYSTEMS WITH INDEPENDENT CURRENT CON-TROL BENEFIT PATIENTS AND THE HEALTH CARE SYSTEM: CASE REPORTS

L. FRANK1, U. Klostermann1, A. Wenk Lang2 Switzerland

Background:

Due to anatomical and technical issues it is more difficult to achieve paresthesia coverage and pain relief with SCS in axial back pain (Oakley, 2006) It is of clinical significance to capture the lower back because pain relief via SCS is dependent upon the best possible pain-paresthesia overlap (Holsheimer, 1997).

Methods:

Three patients (45 to 64 years) with chronic back pain following back surgery were each implanted with a SCS system (Precision™, Advanced Bionics Corporation, Valencia, CA). Two 8-contact percutaneous leads were positioned close to the midline at T6, T7/T8 and T8/T9, respectively. The stimulator was programmed using an automated, patient-controlled system through which current at each contact was fractionalized. An economic model was developed to assess the cost impact of rechargeable devices.

Results:

Good pain/paresthesia overlap was attained in all patients by using complex programme configurations and high pulse widths (550µs, 690µs and 360µs). Pain reduction varied between 50% and 80% 2 weeks post implantation. All three patients reported positive impact on quality of life and reduction of pain medication. Battery devices were recharged every 2 to 14 days.

The economic analysis showed that rechargeable devices avoid costly replacements and are cost saving already after 3 years.

Conclusions: Although past reports have demonstrated difficulties in relieving axial back pain, the new independent current controlled rechargeable SCS system overcame some of the technical difficulties and provided good pain relief by delivering high stimulation parameters not available with previous technology. Rechargeable devices may also reduce follow-up costs.